Zebra Seabream – Diplodus cervinus cervinus


The Zebra Seabream, also known as Oman Porgy, is a species in the family of Sparidae and thus belongs to the superclass of the bony fish.

Zebra Seabream - Diplodus cervinus cervinus Osteichthyes bony fish diving canary islands species atlantic ocean
Zebra Seabream – Diplodus cervinus cervinus

Description

Diplodus cervinus has a laterally compressed body, with a light colour and six vertical, black streaks. One of these streaks passes threw the eyes, while the others pass over the body. The mouth runs sharp and has thick lips.
It reaches a maximum size of 50cm.

Habitat and Distribution

The Zebra Seabream lives over rocky ground, in depths down to 300m.

When diving in the Canaries you can see it very often.

Furthermore, its distribution area extends from the Bay of Biscay through the Canaries, Cape Verde, along the coast of West Africa, all the way to South Africa. It is also found in the Mediterranean Sea.

Biology

Diplodus cervinus lives solitary or in groups of up to 5 animals of different sizes. It feeds on small invertebrates, sea urchins, worms or mussels.

They reach an age of up to 17 years.

While females are sexually mature at the age of 4, this occurs with males at 5 years. The propagation takes place from spring to summer, with the wedding from May to June. The Zebra Seabream is polygamous, one male has several females.